Sentence Structure: Compound Predicates

“I want to bake a cake and eat it all!” This sentence has just one subject but two verbs. To complement the previous article on compound subjects, this time we’ll discuss compound predicates. Compound predicates allow you to make your writing sound more smooth and natural by combining events that occur to the same subject.... Continue Reading →

What’s the difference between i.e. and e.g.?

These little abbreviations are actually cases of Latin that have snuck into modern English usage. It’s safe to say that most people don’t know what they stand for, and most aren’t exactly sure about their usage either. Become an example-writing expert with this article! What do they mean? As mentioned, i.e. and e.g. are abbreviations for... Continue Reading →

Sentence Structure: Compound Subjects

“My friend and I are going to the movies together.” This example uses “and” to create a sentence with more than one subject, allowing the author to describe actions or identities of more than one noun at a time. This article will explain the use of compound subjects, complementing the article on compound predicates. Plural... Continue Reading →

Quotation Rules: Dialogue

The first article discussed the basics of what quotation marks mean and when to use single versus double marks. The second article explained some special formatting tricks to help you make quotations fit your specific work of writing. This one will help you iron out how to represent spoken lines, or dialogue, in text. Who... Continue Reading →

Quotation Rules: Formatting

So you want to include a quotation, but the tense in the quoted material doesn’t match what you’re writing. Or perhaps something like this happens: “I want to explain to you how the book said ‘reading will change them.’ ” Suppose the original line in the book said, “People often find that experiences from reading... Continue Reading →

Quotation Rules: Basics

“If it’s worth writing, it’s worth writing right.” Quotes can add a lot of character to your writing and also give you more credibility. They’re a very important element of expression both for creative and academic writing, but the rules for using and formatting them are detailed. This series of articles will discuss the ins... Continue Reading →

How do you use a colon?

It looks a lot like the semicolon, but the meaning and usage of the colon are different. The colon expresses a clear connection between the parts of the sentence in which it is used: the second clause gives more information about the topic of the first. What are the rules? For a sentence including a colon... Continue Reading →

How do you use a semicolon?

It’s one punctuation mark no one really seems too sure about: the semicolon. In fact, many writers sheepishly avoid using it, making this face pretty appropriate ^^; There’s no need to be hesitant about semicolons, though! They’re a useful tool to add variety to your writing, and you can put them to work for you... Continue Reading →

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